Virtual Art Hanging

In my continued effort to make use of this my downtime, I have started working on my virtual art hanging project. In essence, I am using the skills that I learned in my architectural CAD classes to create virtual rooms in which to hang my artwork. As I delve deeper into my own designs, it becomes apparent to me that I do not have to stick to a “rooms-only” theme. I have been taking copious notes as the ideas come to me.

As with other self-started projects, I am sharing my initial attempts with those who may find them interesting. And, of course, I am open to feedback and suggestions. Here’s what I’ve got so far…

This is a fairly simple rendering compared to the last one I completed for my Architectural Rendering class. I used the same autoCAD drawing as a template. The room has a gallery feel with while painted walls and stealth lighting that is softly projected around the perimeter of the dropped ceiling. I alternated between two different tile colors to see which worked best with the lighting. The large carpet and leather/wood bench are meant to create a warm, residential feel.

I created a custom fireplace with custom ceramic poker holders. Three art pieces hang above the fireplace. The largest is my current favorite untitled concrete panel panel. It does not appear in its original form with stainless steel bolts at each corner. Instead, it has been cropped and framed in brushed chrome. To the left and right are enlarged versions of some older ink drawings of mine framed in anodized aluminum.

A simplified rendering featuring a custom fireplace.  No art or furniture has been added.

A simplified rendering featuring a custom fireplace. No art or furniture has been added.

Wide-angle view of the fireplace art display.  Art has been superimposed and a piece of furniture has been added.

Wide-angle view of the fireplace art display. Art has been superimposed and a piece of furniture has been added.

Close-up angled view of the fireplace art display.

Close-up angled view of the fireplace art display.

I know it’s only my first rusty attempt since graduating, but I feel like I need to make a much more elaborate attempt. As our instructor, Brian Lym of Lym Architecture told us in class, it’s going to take a long time to master the application of materials, mapping and lighting to lend indistinguishable realism to the environment.

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